Posts

Stuff the Bus

A Drop In The Bucket

Where does your dollar go? For over 120 years The Salvation Army has had bell ringers outside during the Christmas season, collecting donations in our iconic red kettles. During this season it’s not hard to imagine a hungry child or struggling family receiving food and shelter thanks to the community’s support. But that’s not where it ends. Read on to learn how one small town in Alabama benefits from the community’s support of The Salvation Army.

 

No Place To Call Home

Homelessness is a hard life, and it touches communities big and small. Even in a small town like Gadsden, Alabama, there are those who have no place to call home. And it is the community that is helping them, though their donations to The Salvation Army. “We’re lodging an average of 10-15 (people) a night. Getting them off the street,” says Captain Dennis Hayes, the Gadsden Salvation Army Corps Officer. Those needs are often more acute at Christmas, but they do not end after December. Thankfully, the red kettle donations help to fund the work of The Salvation Army year-round. “We average around 45-50 people a year, helping them get out of homelessness,” Captain Hayes says.

 

Needs Beyond Homelessness

Those in need are not always homeless. Holiday meals can stretch an already thin budget, and those struggling to make a living often find themselves without enough money for food. Attending to the needs of the community remains a year-round mission for The Salvation Army. “We feed several thousand people year. Not all of them are homeless but they are low income and the money just doesn’t go far enough for food,” says Captain Hayes.

And hot meals are not the only way to serve. Recently, the Gadsden Corps began a program that can help people continue to make meals in their own homes. “We just now started our senior food program. They come in once a month to pick up a prepackaged box of food,” says Vermelle Bonfanti, Social Service Case Worker for The Salvation Army of Gadsden.

 

Project SHARE

But again, food is not the only need. The community helps keep the lights on for those in need with Project SHARE, which is funded by Alabama Power customers who donate through their monthly electric bills. “On your bill, when you pay your bill it asks, ‘would you like to donate to the SHARE program’ and that’s where that money comes from,” says Bonfanti. These funds allow The Salvation Army to directly aid those in need. “We gave out $8,000 worth of money this year to people who needed help with their power bills as well as gas,” says Bonfanti.

 

Help All Year Long

The money that’s placed in the red kettle is only one avenue for giving, but those resources are part of The Salvation Army’s mission to do the most good in the communities we serve all year long. Donations to our kettles help provide meals, supplemented with donations of food. They help provide services, supplemented by the aid of volunteers. “On top of that, we also give spiritual and emotional care,” says Captain Hayes, “if we can’t do anything but listen we try to do that. We’re there to help them, so that‘s a part of what we do for the community, we try to make it a better place to live.”

You can help by donating to our kettles in person, and now you can also give to our online red kettle here: Online Red Kettle

The Salvation Army Breaks Ground on $25 Million Center of Hope Campus

Over 200 people turned out to help The Salvation Army of Birmingham celebrate the construction launch of the new   Salvation Army Center of Hope, a 119,000 square foot facility, which will include additional emergency and transitional housing, and a new education and workforce development center for clients and the Birmingham community.

The Center of Hope will be funded by the Building Hope Capital Campaign initiative, which is a $15 million capital campaign. The 4.1 acre campus will be comprised of a building complex that will place major Salvation Army programs and services together for a one-stop location to provide comprehensive family, community and social services. The new facility will allow The Salvation Army room for future expansion and growth.  The program and services housed at the New Center of Hope will offer solutions to some of the biggest societal issues and challenges faced today by families, youth, our neighborhoods and our city – problems such as poverty, homelessness, addiction and education.

“This is an important day in the history of The Salvation Army of Birmingham. We’ve been providing services in the city since 1899 and have been in the same building for nearly 50 years,” said Major Bob Parker, Area Commander. “The new Center of Hope will provide an opportunity to serve those in need in new ways and we are excited about the impact it will make in people’s lives for years to come.”

Meet Our New Divisional Commanders

Steve Morris Wendy Morris salvation army alm dc

Majors Wendy and Steve Morris

 

The Morris family’s move from the Oklahoma–Arkansas Division to the Alabama–Louisiana–Mississippi Division has been such a hectic here to there, there to here, even Doctor Seuss wouldn’t be able to keep track of it in his library of books. To say Majors Steve and Wendy Morris hit the ground running in ALM is an understatement, just ask their children Angela (22) and Andrew(14).

The Morrises, within their first few weeks of taking over as Divisional Commanders, have visited all but five sets of officers and their families in this Division. Now, add to that schedule a massive flood in southern Louisiana, and you understand there has been no chance to slow down. “This is very intentional on our part,” said Major Steve Morris. “To go out and see our people, it is intentional to meet and encourage our people first, the most valuable asset of any Army.”

But, Major Morris says these visits aren’t about directing, more about supporting than anything else.

“We meet them at their homes, read a scripture, and pray a blessing. Asking God to make their home a place of rest and rectifying.”

It’s interesting to find out that the Majors Morris never worked in a divisional headquarters until they were appointed Divisional Commanders over AOK four years ago. Major Steve Morris says he was given some great advice before accepting that appointment.

While Majors Morris were serving as National Capital Area Commanders in Washington, DC, The Territorial Commander, Commissioner David Jeffery “assigned us as Divisional Leaders in AOK and instructed us to serve as the ‘corps officer to the corps officers’ and that continues to be my marching orders to this day.”

Major Morris says he is more comfortable at the corps level because that’s the “heart of the army” still, he wants the success of this Division to be a democracy rather than a monarchy.  The Headquarter’s sole purpose is to resource the field units in order for each to be prepared and equipped to serve their respective communities with the best programs possible.

“I have no interest in being a boss. I am passionate about leading an effective team.” The members of that team include Divisional Officers, Corps Officers serving in the field appointments all across the three state region and all employees and volunteers in each community.  An Army tends to accomplish its mission when all are moving toward the same goal.

He also looks to lead this Division more like a business, citing his favorite tv show, The Profit.  The main character focuses on three main areas to grow businesses…products, the process and people. Our advantage is that our product is helping people improve their process to productive living.

“By looking at the communities we serve and helping our officers get better in these three areas, I think that’s our priority, put an emphasis on our people. Our greatest asset is our people.”

Major Morris adds he is very impressed with ALM so far, but still needs a little more time to set goals for himself and the Division.  “My mission is to train, equip and resource every officer, soldier and employee to reach their God-Given potential to continue to Do the Most Good across the three state region.”

“More time” being the key, but with five more sets of officers yet to visit, school underway and Christmas rapidly approaching, don’t look for the Morrises to slow down anytime soon.

 

— Jon Kalahar, Communications Director, Salvation Army ALM Division

Volunteers Arrive As Salvation Army Starts Supplies Hand Out

dillard university student volunteers louisiana flood

Baton Rouge resident, Vanessa Yates, stands outside a vacant part of the Cortana Mall now turned into The Salvation Army’s distribution center waiting for her name to be called.  Yates says her home was under eight feet of water just a couple days ago and now she’s trying to clean up. After a few more minutes, a volunteer brings her a case of water, cleaning supplies, and a food box.

“It’s good to find people who care,” said Yates. “It means a lot, I was in tears cleaning out my home yesterday.”

The process is the same for hundreds of other residents who’ve shown up for help. Numbers tabulated by the state emergency operation center estimate as many as 600,000 people impacted by the historic rainfall and flood.

“This disaster is incredibly widespread,” said Major Ed Binnix, Incident Commander. “But we will be here to feed these folks and get them the supplies they need to make it through this.”

Plus, friends and neighbors are stepping up to stand with The Salvation Army in a big way. Neighbors like 100 students from Dillard University who showed up at the distribution center to help organize supplies for each resident who came by.

“Some of these students are from Baton Rouge,” said Jeremy Carter, Dillard’s Director of Student Leadership.  “We know education combined with community service can make a difference.”

They weren’t shy either, as they dove into piles of donated goods and started creating cleaning kits and food boxes to be handed out.

“Not everyone is as fortunate as we are. It’s very important to make a difference,” said Anwar Robinson, Dillard Resident Life Coordinator.

The Salvation Army depends on the passion and compassion of others, like students who volunteer or residents who show up to donate supplies to truly make a difference in times of unspeakable disaster.


To help those in these flooded areas across Southeast Louisiana, you can donate by going to http://give.salvationarmyusa.org/gulf_coast_floods.

About The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide.

Father/Son Team Delivers Food and Hope in Baton Rouge Flood

la floods, ketcham, volunteers

The Ketchams make a great team when it comes to disaster response. The father, son duo are one of the most experienced crews working in Baton Rouge this week following historic flooding throughout many parts of Southern Louisiana.

“I know how he wants things…I can anticipate what he wants,” said Ike Ketcham.

Dan drives and Ike navigates. They have worked as a team since Hurricane Gustav.

The pair moved to New Orleans shortly after Hurricane Katrina hit looking for work in construction. What they found was a way to help those in desperate need.

“We’ve had people try to pay us for the meals we give them off the canteen,” said Dan Ketcham. “I tell them I will only accept a handshake. You can see their surprise first, then the gratitude.”

Despite how “fluid” things seem to go on their canteen, their relationship hasn’t always been so smooth. Not too long ago, Dan was asked to read the bible scripture during church services at the New Orleans Salvation Army. He read from Luke 15…the story of the prodigal son.

“It took me a long time to read that cause my son was lost. I got choked up,” said Ketcham.

Ike saw what that scripture did to his father. Dan says he can’t explain what happened after that but Ike did a one eighty.

At one time, caught up in drugs and alcohol, Ike says The Salvation Army changed his life.

“The Salvation Army gave me the opportunity to change my life,” said Ike Ketcham. “I feel like I’m the luckiest person ever.”

Now, the Ketchams run their “ministry” out of a canteen each time they are called upon.

“I see how people are grateful, and the community is changed. It blows my mind every time we go out,” said Ike.

“The Salvation Army is a family, they welcomed me with open arms, and that’s what I do from the canteen,” says Dan.


To help those in these flooded areas across Southeast Louisiana, you can donate by going to http://give.salvationarmyusa.org/gulf_coast_floods.

About The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide.

ALM personnel heading to West Virginia aiding Army’s response to “historic” flood

West Virginia 2The Salvation Army is actively helping survivors of the “historic” flooding in West Virginia, but with more rain expected and so many residents in need, the Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi (ALM) Division has accepted the request to send our Emergency/Disaster Service Director, Terry Lightheart and Baton Rouge Corps Officer, Captain Brett Meredith to help with The Salvation Army’s response.

“The Salvation Army rallies to those in need,” said Lightheart. “Right now, the greatest need in West Virginia is getting food, shelter, and emotional and spiritual care.  We are working with government agencies, other relief organizations and thousands of volunteers. We have to work together to do all we can to help those affected get back to some normalcy as soon as possible.”

“The flooding has been devastating to the region, and as I prepare to go to the affected area, I pray that The Salvation Army and other organizations can provide comfort, care, and material assistance to those who may have lost everything,” states Captain Meredith.

The flooding began Thursday when nine inches or more of rain fell on parts of West Virginia in six to eight hours. Forty-four counties, primarily in the southeastern part of the state, were under a state of emergency on Thursday night.

In the first 72 hours, The Salvation Army provided more than 6,600 meals, nearly 3,400 snacks, and more 7,500 drinks to flood victims and emergency responders.  These services will continue as long as needed and as requested by West Virginia County Emergency Operation Centers.  As relief efforts continue, The Salvation Army anticipates widespread distribution of cleanup supplies and the initiation of case work after the July 4th holiday.

How people can help:

You can help by providing financial assistance to fund the flood relief work in West Virginia.  Those who wish to support The Salvation Army’s disaster response may do so by sending a check earmarked “June 2016 West Virginia Floods”  to their local Salvation Army office, online at http://tinyurl.com/zu6rn47, or by making a credit card donation at 1-800-SAL-ARMY.  Be sure to designate the donation for the “June 2016 West Virginia Floods.”

Although The Salvation Army is not requesting in-kind goods donations at this time, gifts of gently-used household goods, clothing, etc., are always needed by Salvation Army Family Stores to support their work in the local community. Find out more at SAtruck.org, or call 1-800-SA-TRUCK (1-800-728-7825).

 About The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. For more information, go to www.salvationarmyalm.org.

Flight to the North Pole

On Dec. 15, 2015, The Salvation Army of Jackson, MS, participated in the 10th Annual Flight to the North Pole event. More than 60 children were treated to the event, where they were “flown” to the North Pole by the MS Air National Guard, met Santa & Mrs. Claus, played with elves, and each received their very own bike and sack of toys and goodies! The event was sponsored by Y101, the Mississippi Air National Guard, the Brain Injury Association, and The Salvation Army Jackson Metro Area.

The Salvation Army Responds As Storms Wreak Havoc Across Gulf States

(story originally posted by Thad Hicks on disaster.salvationarmyusa.org)

Jackson, MS (April 28, 2015) – The Salvation Army of Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi has responded to four separate emergency situations across the division due to severe weather.

The storms affected residents near Dothan, Alabama, in the small community of Columbia, several families are displaced due to storms Saturday. Majors George and Patty Price, along with employees and volunteers, started by serving dinner out of a local gymnasium. Their operation has since expanded to serving lunch and dinner. The Dothan Corps is also providing drinks and ice for the nearly 800 homes that lost power.

“This is what we do,” said Major George Price. “The need was there and we simply stepped in to help.”
On the Alabama Gulf Coast, a sudden storm with high winds caused an annual boat regatta to end in tragedy Saturday evening just off Dauphin Island near Mobile, Alabama.  The storm capsized several boats leading to at least two deaths. The Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama responded to help serve food, drinks and snacks to local law enforcement and Coast Guard officials who are searching the Mobile Bay for missing boaters.  To reach searchers, The Salvation Army loaded a Mobile County Sheriff’s Office boat with food and drinks to take out to the law enforcement agencies.

“It’s just one less thing they have to worry about,” Patricia Finkbohner, Salvation Army director of development and community services, said. “They didn’t want to come in and take a break, they really wanted to stay out and search.”

The Salvation Army is also providing emotional and spiritual care to family members who are waiting for their loved ones to be found.

Rough weather Monday led to a possible tornado touchdown near Baton Rouge. Power was knocked out to several thousand residents in and around the area. The Baton Rouge Corps responded with a canteen to one of the hardest hit areas in Killian, Louisiana and passed out food bags.  “Many folks are without power and may not have been prepared for this storm,” said Captain Brett Meredith, Commanding Officer, The Salvation Army of Baton Rouge. “The Salvation Army will be there to meet these immediate needs, and we will be there as long as residents need our help.”

The same storm to blow through Baton Rouge also caused wind damage and flooding in New Orleans. At the New Orleans Area Command, the Center of Hope lost power. So, Major David Worthy and the overnight staff manned their crisis stations at the facility throughout the night to make sure the residents stayedsafe and secure.

“We used our disaster canteen truck to power fans and portable lights to shed a little light and move a little air around to keep things more bearable,” said Major Worthy.
Power has since been restored to the Center of Hope in New Orleans.


The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster survivors, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children.  82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide.

DHQ employees lend a hand at the Monroe, LA Corps

Everybody could use a little extra help at one time or another.  This is true of individuals, communities, and in this case, the Monroe, Louisiana Corps of The Salvation Army. In the wake of an unexpected change in leadership and staffing, the Monroe Corps found themselves overwhelmed with an abundance of chores and a lack of manpower. The Salvation Army Divisional Headquarters for the Alabama– Louisiana– Mississippi Division, located in Jackson, MS, gave permission for its employees to travel to Monroe for a day to help out. On Wednesday, February 11, those who chose to go did the round–trip in one day, spending the 5 hours they had in Monroe sorting and organizing all of the canned goods at the location.

Cindy Chesney, who was on just her 8th day as H.R./Office Manager at the Monroe Corps, had already made vast improvements to the Corps before the DHQ team arrived, but there was still much to do. According to Ms. Chesney, “The help getting organized is greatly appreciated and shows DHQ does care and is willing to help where needed. True teamwork! With the new transition, everything around the Monroe Corps is now organized and ready for the new officers so they don’t have to be concerned with cleaning and organizing. They can focus on the building needs, the community and the church.”

Below are the thoughts of the participants on what this opportunity to serve meant to each of them.

Gina Oubre, Divisional Human Resources Director: “It was a good day— to be able to go in and work hands-on to help a local community rather than sitting in an office. It makes the people that we serve more real and gives us the opportunity to assist the local communities from a hands-on standpoint.”

Lacey Sanders, Human Resources Generalist: “I absolutely love my job and working for The Salvation Army, but how I got involved with this organization was by working hands on at the Corps and with the Community.  That’s what began my love for this place.  My day to day job with The Salvation Army is working behind a desk and reviewing paperwork and processes so getting the chance to go to Monroe and really physically work hard to help improve a location was so rewarding. Exhausting! But rewarding. ”

April Thames, Benefits Coordinator: “I’m just happy to help and see what a Corps looks like in another location. It feels good to help them. Hopefully we can do this (again) and not just as a one-time thing. It’s nice helping a location that needs assistance cleaning up or sorting stuff. I enjoyed doing it. Maybe next time we can go and help another location.”

Maggie Zakikhani, recently retired, former DHQ employee: “I was happy to be able to go and help. It made me feel like we accomplished something good, so that they’ll be able to feed the people without a lot of problems.”

Volunteers are always needed. If you would like to volunteer at the Monroe Corps, visit their website or stop by their location at 105 Hart Street. As Cindy says, “The employees here are all personable and welcome volunteers and the help and support they can give.”

 

Salvation Army Neediest Families supporters bring ‘smiles, joy and comfort’ to Coastal Alabama families in need

MOBILE, Alabama — As the 2014 Neediest Families Campaign draws to a close, your generous donations have once again raised more than $150,000 for The Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama, Maj. Mark Brown, commander of the Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama, said. Already those dollars are hard at work helping all of the families featured in this year’s campaign — bringing smiles, joy and comfort to many.

The Salvation Army has provided assistance with rent, utilities, food, furniture, and more, as these families work through their challenges. For this final piece of the 2014 Neediest Families Campaign, here are updates from a few of the families who would love to say “Thank You!”

salvation army neediest logo 2013.jpg

Demetrius McConnell

Demetrius McConnell has started off the new year by landing a new job! Demetrius was working for the 9-1-1 call center in Mobile County, until the 12-hour shift work put a serious strain on the single mother’s ability to care for her 10-year-old son, LaDarrius. But last week, she was interviewed and offered a job with Mobile Infirmary Medical Center’s dispatch.

“I’m so excited! The benefits will be great, and I have dispatch experience, so I know it won’t be hard to learn their system,” explained Demetrius. “And they rotate your days off, so I’ll be able to spend time with my son even though I’ll be working the 2:30-11 p.m. shift.”

Demetrius had been out of work since September, and had to cash in her retirement just to pay the bills through November. The Salvation Army was able to help pay some bills, so she wouldn’t lose her car or have her utilities cut off.

“I’m really grateful. Just helping with one bill would have been enough, but that was so wonderful. It’s a blessing, and I’m so appreciative.”

The soft-spoken mother also smiled ear to ear as she thought back to Christmas Day. She originally wasn’t looking forward to the holiday, knowing she wouldn’t be able to provide anything for LaDarrius. But The Salvation Army made sure he had plenty to open on Christmas morning.

“Christmas was perfect. I put up a little Charlie Brown Christmas tree, and I would put the presents out one at a time. He would try to guess what they were. Then I put his bike out for Christmas morning. When I saw the look on his face, it was priceless. I wish I knew the donor so I could tell them thank you!”

Demetrius is looking forward to finishing her criminal justice degree and rebuilding her savings.

Therasa Todd

Therasa Todd had overcome a lifelong battle with drugs just a few years ago. She got clean, took care of all her legal issues, and even got her daughter back. But everything she worked hard for starting crumbling before her eyes just before the holidays. She lost her job, lost everything she owned in a house fire, and her car broke down.

The Salvation Army paid to have her car repaired, so that she could continue looking for work and taking her daughter, Kylee, to school.

“That meant a lot to me. If I didn’t have a car, I wouldn’t have anything right now. It’s been my home, and everything I own is in this car right now,” said Therasa.

She still needs a master electrician to pull a permit before they can move forward with the fire repairs. And although she did find a job with another dog-grooming service, the work was only seasonal and she has been let go.

“It feels like I take one step forward, and fall back ten.”

The Salvation Army recently helped her fill up her car tank with gas, and the gas station owner even came outside and handed her $40. The small gestures brought her to tears. She said even strangers have shown incredible compassion since being featured in the Neediest Families Campaign.

“The day I was shopping for Kylee’s Christmas gifts, a man came up to me at the Dollar Tree. He said he saw me in the newspaper. At first I was kind of embarrassed, but then he hugged me real tight. He said he knows it’s a struggle to stay clean. He let me pick out some stuff for Kylee, and even took me to Rue 21 to pick out some shirts for her.”

Therasa has continued to maintain her sobriety, and has even found a new church and a deeper faith.

“I am excited for the new year. I’m going to get a job, I want to get a house. Things are going to get better.”

Shelia McMillian

The last year and a half had been tough for Shelia McMillian. Her oldest son, Brandon, started getting into serious trouble, and she lost her job because of all the time she spent dealing with him. The as-needed PRN work she picked up was barely enough to put food on the table.

For the McMillians, The Salvation Army was able to catch up Shelia’s water bill and help catch up daycare tuition for her 4-year-old son, Bryson.

“I’m overjoyed. The daycare allows me to work, and it gives him a place where he can learn. Bryson has a speech impairment, so he’s working with the therapists and learning how to talk,” said Shelia.

Shelia’s PRN hours have since picked up, and she’s steadily working two days a week now. Some of her former co-workers have reached out since seeing the story, hoping to help her get a job back at Franklin Primary Health Center. Even a friend who saw the story helped her get her heater fixed just in time for the arctic weather.

Sheila was also brought to “tears of joy” when she received gifts and clothes for the boys from The Salvation Army. There had been nothing under the tree last Christmas, but she said this was a “great” Christmas.

“Just to see them happy made my day,” she said.

Brandon’s face lit up as he showed off his new skateboard, and he was even thrilled about his new clothes.

“The first time I wore my new clothes was to church. I looked really nice. I felt like a new man,” the troubled teen said with a proud smile.

Other neediest families

Many of the other Neediest Families share similar stories of help and gratitude. Sarita West received beds for her two boys, and assistance with bills. Shanita and Ernest Smith received the dressers and bedding they couldn’t afford after escaping the projects. And with the help of an AL.com/Press-Register reporter’s friends, Ashley Knight received a house full of furniture for her new home.

There will be many more needy families that turn to The Salvation Army for help. More families will face job loss, health problems, and tough times. Though the campaign runs prominently during the holiday season, need knows no season. The Salvation Army will continue accepting donations for the Neediest Families Program, as they continue to assist families in need throughout the year.

Neediest Families

  • Many families in Mobile and Baldwin counties struggle from day to day and throughout the year with health, financial, housing, employment and other concerns. When critical needs arise, The Salvation Army is ready to assist.
  • Now in its 18th year, the Neediest Families campaign has helped hundreds of families as a result of the generosity of the Gulf Coast community. Traditionally begun each Thanksgiving and continued through the Christmas holiday, the campaign’s goal each year is to raise awareness and funds for The Salvation Army’s major charity of the year. The Neediest Families campaign has raised almost $3 million since its inception in 1996.

    Families are screened and selected by The Salvation Army to receive help.

    Today’s contributions: $33,070. Grand total for 2014 campaign: $154,393.17. Grand total for 2013 campaign: $154,876.29.

    In memory of Katy & Al, $10,000; In memory of Ben May, $5,000; Tal & Julie Vickers, $5,000; Conwell’s Pharmacy, $1,000; Mr. & Mrs. Tom Rosandich, $1,000; In honor of Salvation Army employees, $1,000; Harold and Carlos Parkman, $1,000; Carol and Dave Norris, $750; J.E. McCarty, $600; In honor of our service men and women, $500; In Memory of C W Burtz, $500; Theobald Family Fund, $500; The David & Sue Vosloh Charitable Gift Fund, $500; Melanie Bunting, $400; In memory of Robert L. Newman, $300; Chris and Jody Conrad, $250; Fred Bauman, $250; Larry and Jan Thomas, $250; Dr. Randall Powell, $250; Marion and Pat Hamilton, $250; Virginia Walton, $200; James Hollon III, $200; Aubrey Stegall, $200; H.C. Schenkenberger, $200; Mobile Women’s Duplicate Bridge Club, $175; Dennis Williams, $150; Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Simpson, $125; Sunshine Trotters Bowling League, $105; In memory of Henry E. Reimer, $100; Anne & Leon Brown, $100; Mark Kraft, $100; Betty Beverly, $100; Robert Voorhees, $100; Patricia Roland, $100; Jane and Frank Feagin, $100; Julio Turrens, $100; Oliver Delchamps, $100; Deborah Hood, $100; and Anonymous, $1,415.

  • How to donateTo contribute to the Neediest Families campaign, go to NeediestFamilies.org to donate online; call 1-800-SAL ARMY (1-800-725-2769) to donate by credit card; or send your check or money order made out to The Salvation Army Neediest Families campaign, to 1009 Dauphin St., Mobile, AL 36604.