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Boots on the Ground, Preparing for Hurricane Delta | The Salvation Army Prepared and Ready to Respond to Disaster

Jackson, MS (October 6, 2020) – As Category 4 Hurricane Delta makes its way into the Gulf of Mexico, life-threatening storm surge and heavy rainfall is possible anywhere from Southeast Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle Thursday night through Saturday morning. The Salvation Army is monitoring the situation closely and preparing to respond as needed by placing disaster relief equipment and personnel on standby.

“The Salvation Army is prepared for Hurricane Delta,” stated Terry Lightheart, Emergency Disaster Services Director of The Salvation Army Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi Division. “We are monitoring the system in conjunction with local and state emergency management partners and national weather service agencies. We currently have seven (7) mobile feeding units ready to go and another seven (7) units on standby to provide food and hydration to those in the potentially affected areas,” Terry Lightheart added.

As natural disasters can increase mental stress, The Salvation Army’s Emotional & Spiritual Care HOPEline remains available. Anyone needing a caring listener – whether because of natural disaster, COVID-19, or the stress of life in general – can call 844-458-HOPE (4673) for support.

For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, follow the social feed on Twitter at @salarmyeds or visit disaster.salvationarmyusa.org. To donate to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts, visit HelpSalvationArmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

The Salvation Army Providing Hurricane Laura Disaster Relief Throughout Louisiana

Lake Charles, LA (September 2, 2020)—The Salvation Army is serving throughout the state of Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura. Disaster relief services are ongoing in Alexandria, Monroe, and Lake Charles, as official Salvation Army crews are manning mobile feeding units providing meals, drinks, snacks, personal hygiene kits, and cleaning supplies to anyone in need.

The largest effort is in the Lake Charles area, where The Salvation Army has set up a full IMAT team and currently has a total of 21 mobile feeding units [canteens] serving the area. The feeding operations in Lake Charles are supported by Southern Baptist Disaster Relief, who have volunteered 20 personnel from Mississippi for 14 days to serve by preparing hot meals on The Salvation Army’s Field Kitchen which are then distributed by the canteens. Canteen service locations are posted every day on the Salvation Army Lake Charles Facebook page as well as on The Salvation Army’s Emergency Disaster Services website at www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org. In addition to the canteens at set locations, the feeding units are also roving the neighborhoods, finding people in need where they are, and offering much-needed help and hope.

Emotional and spiritual care is also a large aspect of The Salvation Army’s disaster relief services. Canteen workers in Lake Charles are actively taking prayer requests from the people they serve and handing them over to the Emotional and Spiritual Care [ESC] Officer, Major Robert Lyle, who ensures that every request is prayed for. The Salvation Army’s Emotional & Spiritual Care HOPEline (844-458-HOPE) is also available every day between 8 AM to 11 PM CDT to anyone needing a caring listener.

To date, The Salvation Army has provided the following disaster relief in response to Hurricane Laura throughout the state of Louisiana:

• 35,556 Meals

• 33,030 Drinks

• 21,438 Snacks

• 99 Cleanup kits (per kit)

• 45 Cleaning Supplies / Tools (per order)

• 471 Personal Hygiene Kits

• 109 Food Boxes

• Emotional and Spiritual Care to 521 Individuals

The best way to support the disaster work of The Salvation Army by making a financial donation at www.helpsalvationarmy.org or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY. For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, please go to www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org and watch for regular updates on our social media pages at www.facebook.com/salarmyalm/ and www.twitter.com/salarmyalm.

As natural disasters can increase mental stress, The Salvation Army’s Emotional & Spiritual Care HOPEline remains available. Anyone needing a caring listener – whether because of natural disaster, COVID-19, or the stress of life in general – can call 844-458-HOPE (4673) for support. HOPEline hours are 8 AM to 11 PM CDT, 7 days a week.

The Salvation Army Prepared for Hurricane Laura in Louisiana

Lake Charles, LA (August 26, 2020) —  Trained Salvation Army staff and volunteers are prepared to move into Southwest Louisiana in response to Hurricane Laura, which is currently projected to strengthen to a Category 4 hurricane making landfall near the Texas/Louisiana border overnight or early Thursday morning. An Incident Command Team has been activated to operate out of Lake Charles, where The Salvation Army Lake Charles Corps has prepared for the Calcasieu Parish mandatory evacuation. The Salvation Army Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi Division has positioned 14 mobile feeding units, which can produce a combined total of about 10,000 meals per day, on standby and ready to serve affected areas throughout Louisiana.

“The Salvation Army of Lake Charles is prepared for Hurricane Laura,” stated Lieutenant Thomas Marion, Lake Charles Salvation Army Corps Officer. “All of our buildings are secured, and we are ready to serve by making the necessary preparations with staging emergency service vehicles and working with local authorities,” Lieutenant Marion added.

As natural disasters can increase mental stress, The Salvation Army’s Emotional & Spiritual Care HOPEline remains available.  Anyone needing a caring listener – whether because of natural disaster, COVID-19, or the stress of life in general – can call 844-458-HOPE (4673) for support. HOPEline hours are 8 AM to 11 PM CDT, 7 days a week. For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, follow the social feed on Twitter at @salarmyeds or visit disaster.salvationarmyusa.org. To donate to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts, visit HelpSalvationArmy.org.

The Salvation Army Responds to Easter Tornado Outbreak

Jackson, MS (April 13, 2020)—On April 12, 2020, severe weather pummeled the south and produced a tornado outbreak throughout Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. All three states have issued official emergency declarations. The Salvation Army Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi (ALM) Division is responding to the Easter tornado outbreak throughout the three states. Mississippi is the only state of the three that suffered tornado-related fatalities. “The Salvation Army is continuing to assess service delivery needs in affected communities with local emergency management while also considering COVID-19 social distancing precautions. We realize this severe weather event, coupled with COVID-19, is likely a time of great difficulty and increasing anxiety. Beyond our local service delivery of meals, snacks, and beverages, The Salvation Army has established an Emotional and Spiritual Care Hotline at 844-458-HOPE (4673). Hours are seven days a week from 9 AM to 9 PM eastern time,” said Terry Lightheart, Divisional Emergency Disaster Services Director for The Salvation Army Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi Division.

The deadly tornadoes in Mississippi caused a confirmed 11 deaths across Jefferson Davis, Lawrence, Jones, Carroll, Panola, and Walthall counties. A number of other counties across the state are reporting storm damage and over 74,000 power outages. Lt. Brian Hicks, Corps Officer for The Salvation Army Hattiesburg, is preparing their mobile feeding unit to serve in Jefferson Davis County today, where approximately 100 homes were damaged. Major Raymond Pruitt, Salvation Army Corps Officer in Laurel, is assessing needs this morning in Jasper and Jones counties. Other Salvation Army corps officers and service center directors who serve areas impacted by yesterday’s tornadoes are in contact with their local Emergency Management Agency to determine service delivery needs in their area.

Alabama reports nearly 120,000 power outages, with most of the damage consisting of downed trees and power lines. The main area of damage in Alabama is in Etowah County, which is served by The Salvation Army Gadsden Corps. Captain Dennis Hayes, Gadsden Salvation Army Corps Officer, is assessing needs in Boaz and Reece City today. Cynthia Smith, The Salvation Army Walker County Service Center Director, will be providing service to several affected areas today.

Monroe, Louisiana, experienced damage to approximately 200 homes but thankfully, no tornado-related fatalities have been reported. Captain Jerry Casey, Corps Officer for The Salvation Army of Monroe, loaded up his mobile feeding unit and went out to tornado-damaged neighborhoods on Sunday afternoon to provide sandwiches, drinks, and snacks to residents and first responders. “The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic adds new challenges to providing emergency disaster relief. We’re being careful to wear a mask and gloves, and we’re taking social distancing precautions while serving the public,” said Captain Casey. He plans to be back out in the community serving again today.

Financial donations are the best way to meet the evolving needs and to support relief efforts. To donate to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts, visit www.HelpSalvationArmy.org. For the latest Salvation Army disaster response news from across the country visit www.SalArmyEDS.org.

 

Mobile Takes Canteen into the Community to Fill the Gap

The Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama has created a new feeding program to assist at-risk community members who have been impacted by the coronavirus.  Other social service organizations have closed throughout the area due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and the Army is stepping up to serve residents who relied on those organizations.

The Salvation Army’s mobile feeding canteen began distributing water and bagged lunches in downtown Mobile at the Square at Dauphin Street and Park Street this week. The Army was able to provide a meal and prayer for 170 members of the community. The canteen will provide meals at this location every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.

“Many people came to our canteen and told us that they thought they had been forgotten during this crisis. We assured them that we had not forgotten them, but more importantly, God had not forgotten them. The Salvation Army has served the needs of people in Mobile and Baldwin Counties since 1887 and will continue to be here with God’s help,” stated Coastal Alabama Area Commander, Major Thomas Richmond.

This new community feeding program is in addition to services already provided by The Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama, including supplied food, shelter and social services at the three shelter locations—the Family Haven family shelter, the Red Shield Lodge emergency homeless shelter, and the Dauphin Way Lodge drug & alcohol rehabilitation center, as well as financial assistance and an array of other services through their social services office.

To help The Salvation Army continue to serve those affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, make your secure online donation today.

Lake Charles Corps Works Hard to Feed Community as Only Soup Kitchen Still In Service

The Salvation Army of Lake Charles has partnered with the City of Lake Charles to assist with feeding community members who have been impacted by COVID-19. The shelter is the only soup kitchen in the area that has remained open during the pandemic and has been asked to be prepared to feed an additional 2,500 people.

All meals for the Lake Charles community will be provided to-go style at the shelter located at 3020 Legion St. Breakfast is provided 6:30-7:00 am, lunch is provided 12:00-1:30 pm and dinner is provided 4:30-5:00 pm.

The Salvation Army has assisted United Way by sending a Disaster Service Team to feed hundreds of people throughout the city. The shelter has distributed 175 meals to low-income seniors and 378 community members have visited the shelter to receive to-go meals. The Lake Charles Corps is also offering lunch daily in Sulphur, La. at the SC3 Church from 12:00-1:30 pm.

Food boxes from the emergency pantry have been supplied to The Salvation Army church members who are unable to pick up food orders due to disability or lack of transportation. The Salvation Army’s food pantry remains open to the public. Dry goods and toilet paper are available by appointment.

The Lake Charles Corps will continue to serve throughout the city as needed throughout this pandemic.

Serving Lee County Volunteers

Smiths Station, AL (March 7, 2019)— The Salvation Army continues to be a light of help and hope for those affected by the recent devastating Southeast Alabama tornadoes. On Wednesday, March 6, that help took the form of setting up a canteen (mobile feeding unit) at the Lee County Emergency Management Agency’s Volunteer Reception Center that has been established at Smiths Station Baptist Church. Those wishing to volunteer with the county can drop into the center, receive training and an assignment, and head out to do their volunteer work. The Salvation Army is on hand to provide meals, beverages and snacks to those volunteers, and in many cases, to the people the volunteers are heading out to serve.

“I’m just very grateful the tornado hit half a mile from my home in two different directions. It went over my house. I’m very grateful to the Lord that I didn’t get hurt, and I just want to help those that are,” said Yvette Greene, a county volunteer who loaded up her car with meals from The Salvation Army canteen to share with those already in the field. Another volunteer, Tricia Harm, mother of seven, brought four of her children who are old enough to volunteer to the center on Wednesday, to serve those hurting in their community. Tricia and her teenage children came to The Salvation Army canteen for lunch before heading out to their volunteer assignment. “We are volunteering to help clean up, because it’s our town. We’re a military family, but it’s our town. The kids wanted to help and this is what we can do, so this is what we’ll do,” said Tricia.

The Salvation Army is proud to provide for tornado survivors and those who are volunteering to serve their hurting neighbors. To date, The Salvation Army has provided 1,495 meals, 619 drinks, 1,143 snacks, and emotional and spiritual care to 71 individuals. To donate to tornado relief efforts, go to helpsalvationarmy.org.

The Salvation Army serving in 3 locations following tornado outbreak across the South

new orleans tornado canteen

Disaster units in New Orleans, Livingston Parish, LA and Slocumb, AL

Jackson, MS (February 8, 2017) – Severe weather moving across the southern United States dropped multiple tornadoes Tuesday. The Salvation Army has responded with canteens or mobile feeding units to help serve those in need as well as first responders on scene to help.

In Louisiana, six parishes received damage from multiple tornadoes. Roofs where ripped off buildings, structures destroyed, trees toppled over roadways but thankfully no deaths.

The New Orleans area saw the most destructive of the storms. The Salvation Army’s New Orleans Command responded to Chef Menteur Highway and Wilson Road where disaster workers began food service.

“We served 112 meals and 266 drinks from our location, and we plan to help as long as people are in need and are recovery from these storms,” said Major David Worthy, Commanding Officer, The Salvation Army, New Orleans Command.

The Baton Rouge Salvation Army dispatched a canteen to Watson, Louisiana in Livingston Parish where workers served almost one hundred meals and drinks.

“This is difficult work for the first responders and a difficult time for those whose homes have been affected. We are grateful to be able to serve them,” said Captain Brett Meredith, Corps Officer, Baton Rouge Salvation Army.

The Salvation Army also has officers and trained employees on location to provide emotional and spiritual care to any residents and rescue workers who might need someone to talk to or allow us to pray with them.

“Our hearts go out to those who have been touched by Tuesday’s events, and we pray the work of The Salvation Army may ease the burden these folks are feeling during these times,” said Captain Meredith.

A tornado also touched down in Houston County, Alabama near Slocumb, Alabama Tuesday evening.  Alabama emergency officials report power outages, trees down over the roads, and several buildings damaged. The Salvation Army canteen from the Dothan Corps is serving in that location.

How People Can Help
The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation.

  • Donate By Mail: The Salvation Army PO BOX 1959 Atlanta, GA 30301. Please designate ‘February Gulf Coast Tornadoes’ on all checks
  • Donate By Phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769)

Feeding increases as clean up continues in Hattiesburg area

The Salvation Army now has four mobile feeding units covering the areas affected by the early morning tornado that left a path of destruction in and around Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Along the path of Saturday’s storms, roads are still blocked as power crews work to restore electricity to homes.

Salvation Army canteens set up so residents wouldn’t have to walk or drive too far for a hot meal or something to drink.

“I heard glass breaking and something hitting the house,” said Hattiesburg resident, George Dixon.

Dixon walked over for something to eat. He also was prayed for before he left.

“Seeing this truck makes you feel like someone cares about you,” said Dixon.

Veronica Williams drove up to The Salvation Army canteen knowing she could get a hot meal for her family.

“You always show up when people are in need,” said Williams. “You see that red and white, you are about to get help.”

Help comes in many forms. Michelle Overby and Jordyn Lester lived through Katrina on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Now living in Hattiesburg, they saw people in need and wanted to help.

“We drove down this street and saw how the people looked, that was how we looked after Katrina, so we had to help,” said Overby.

Michelle and Jordyn made sandwiches, chips bags, snacks and bought water to hand out, but with the road blocked they couldn’t deliver the food to a local church. That’s when they saw The Salvation Army canteen.

“The Salvation Army helped us and we wanted to do that here,” said Lester.

Michelle and Jordyn asked if they could pass out their food next to the canteen, and our disaster workers even let them use one of our tables.

The Salvation Army prepared and delivered meals, served drinks and snacks, and prayed with folks from the community.

With two mobile feeding units on standby ready to help if needed, disaster personnel with assess the need in the area and work with local and state emergency management agencies to provide for those in need.

How People Can Help
The best way to help after a disaster is to make a financial donation to the charity of your choice. Monetary contributions also support local economies and ensure that businesses can operate when relief supplies diminish.

Canteen workers pull double duty for Baton Rouge flood and Hurricane Matthew, proud to serve

You never know where disaster will strike next. Over the last several months, the southern United States has seen more than its fair share of disaster. In August, historic rainfall in south Louisiana caused flooding like no one had ever seen. Two months later, Hurricane Matthew bared down on Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas with heavy rain and winds flooding homes and knocking down power lines.

In the aftermath of each storm, it was The Salvation Army and its officers, employees and volunteers who brought hope to those in need in the weeks following.

The Army’s response and ability to help would be drastically reduced without the men and women who spend countless hours serving meals, drinks and snacks from our canteens In the Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi Division, we are blessed to have hundreds who give of their time and energy to go above the call of duty as canteen workers.

Four canteen workers stand out these last few months Gary Williams, Birmingham Command, Jerry Casey and Leo Saurez, Mississippi Gulf Coast Command, and Joe McDaniel, Tuscaloosa Corps because they served during the Louisiana floods and after Hurricane Matthew blew through.

Gary Williams grew up in Levittown, PA. He retired from U.S. Steel and is now a driver for The Salvation Army in Birmingham and is responsible for transporting clients, picking up donations and food, and manages the fleet of vehicles in Birmingham, including the canteen.

Gary completed two deployments this year, one in Baton Rouge and the other for Hurricane Matthew. He was initially deployed to Jacksonville, Florida and was relocated to Wilmington, North Carolina after the storm hit.

“I enjoy being a canteen worker because I enjoy helping people out when they really need it,” said Williams. “

Gary says we was glad to have his son, Keith along as a volunteer during the Hurricane Matthew response, but their trip to Florida and then North Carolina was anything but easy.

“On our way traveling from Florida to North Carolina, we had a very difficult time because so many roads were flooded and power lines were down. It was long trip to North Carolina,” said Williams.

Mississippi Gulf Coast’s dream team of canteen workers, Jerry Casey and Leo Saurez say their willingness to work on a canteen comes from just loving to serve others.

Jerry, a Long Island native, laughs at the thought of another disaster so close to these two.

“We are young, healthy and have a desire to help people so it wasn’t a problem. We hope there isn’t another disaster in the next week,” said Casey. “If there is, we will certainly be willing to help!”

Born in the Phillipines, Leo counts among his favorite memories of both the Louisiana flood and Hurricane Matthew being able to help the children they encountered.
“When kids come to the food trucks and I see their smiles,” said Saurez.

 

And, it’s reactions like that that make these canteen workers feel blessed to work for The Salvation Army.

“They say, ‘GOD bless you, we can’t believe you came to serve us.’ As if they felt they weren’t deserving to be served,” said Casey.

“When we see people after a disaster they are so grateful that we are there to help. While serving in Baton Rouge, I met a woman that broke down and started crying and said she wouldn’t know what to do without The Salvation Army. I was able to be there at that moment, give her hug and let her know that there is help out there,” said Williams.

Thank You Gary, Jerry, Leo and Joe for all you do for those in need during times of disaster.

Father/Son Team Delivers Food and Hope in Baton Rouge Flood

la floods, ketcham, volunteers

The Ketchams make a great team when it comes to disaster response. The father, son duo are one of the most experienced crews working in Baton Rouge this week following historic flooding throughout many parts of Southern Louisiana.

“I know how he wants things…I can anticipate what he wants,” said Ike Ketcham.

Dan drives and Ike navigates. They have worked as a team since Hurricane Gustav.

The pair moved to New Orleans shortly after Hurricane Katrina hit looking for work in construction. What they found was a way to help those in desperate need.

“We’ve had people try to pay us for the meals we give them off the canteen,” said Dan Ketcham. “I tell them I will only accept a handshake. You can see their surprise first, then the gratitude.”

Despite how “fluid” things seem to go on their canteen, their relationship hasn’t always been so smooth. Not too long ago, Dan was asked to read the bible scripture during church services at the New Orleans Salvation Army. He read from Luke 15…the story of the prodigal son.

“It took me a long time to read that cause my son was lost. I got choked up,” said Ketcham.

Ike saw what that scripture did to his father. Dan says he can’t explain what happened after that but Ike did a one eighty.

At one time, caught up in drugs and alcohol, Ike says The Salvation Army changed his life.

“The Salvation Army gave me the opportunity to change my life,” said Ike Ketcham. “I feel like I’m the luckiest person ever.”

Now, the Ketchams run their “ministry” out of a canteen each time they are called upon.

“I see how people are grateful, and the community is changed. It blows my mind every time we go out,” said Ike.

“The Salvation Army is a family, they welcomed me with open arms, and that’s what I do from the canteen,” says Dan.


To help those in these flooded areas across Southeast Louisiana, you can donate by going to http://give.salvationarmyusa.org/gulf_coast_floods.

About The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide.

The Salvation Army Responds As Storms Wreak Havoc Across Gulf States

(story originally posted by Thad Hicks on disaster.salvationarmyusa.org)

Jackson, MS (April 28, 2015) – The Salvation Army of Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi has responded to four separate emergency situations across the division due to severe weather.

The storms affected residents near Dothan, Alabama, in the small community of Columbia, several families are displaced due to storms Saturday. Majors George and Patty Price, along with employees and volunteers, started by serving dinner out of a local gymnasium. Their operation has since expanded to serving lunch and dinner. The Dothan Corps is also providing drinks and ice for the nearly 800 homes that lost power.

“This is what we do,” said Major George Price. “The need was there and we simply stepped in to help.”
On the Alabama Gulf Coast, a sudden storm with high winds caused an annual boat regatta to end in tragedy Saturday evening just off Dauphin Island near Mobile, Alabama.  The storm capsized several boats leading to at least two deaths. The Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama responded to help serve food, drinks and snacks to local law enforcement and Coast Guard officials who are searching the Mobile Bay for missing boaters.  To reach searchers, The Salvation Army loaded a Mobile County Sheriff’s Office boat with food and drinks to take out to the law enforcement agencies.

“It’s just one less thing they have to worry about,” Patricia Finkbohner, Salvation Army director of development and community services, said. “They didn’t want to come in and take a break, they really wanted to stay out and search.”

The Salvation Army is also providing emotional and spiritual care to family members who are waiting for their loved ones to be found.

Rough weather Monday led to a possible tornado touchdown near Baton Rouge. Power was knocked out to several thousand residents in and around the area. The Baton Rouge Corps responded with a canteen to one of the hardest hit areas in Killian, Louisiana and passed out food bags.  “Many folks are without power and may not have been prepared for this storm,” said Captain Brett Meredith, Commanding Officer, The Salvation Army of Baton Rouge. “The Salvation Army will be there to meet these immediate needs, and we will be there as long as residents need our help.”

The same storm to blow through Baton Rouge also caused wind damage and flooding in New Orleans. At the New Orleans Area Command, the Center of Hope lost power. So, Major David Worthy and the overnight staff manned their crisis stations at the facility throughout the night to make sure the residents stayedsafe and secure.

“We used our disaster canteen truck to power fans and portable lights to shed a little light and move a little air around to keep things more bearable,” said Major Worthy.
Power has since been restored to the Center of Hope in New Orleans.


The Salvation Army

The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster survivors, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children.  82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide.