Divisional Outreach Amid COVID-19

The Salvation Army Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi has been here to help our neighbors in need throughout 2020. Due to back-to-back hurricanes and the global COVID-19 pandemic, added hardships have left many in a much greater need than ever before, and The Salvation Army was blessed and happy to be available to serve. Here are a few stories from throughout the ALM Division.

 

Vicksburg

A client lost their job at a daycare center due to COVID-19 restrictions. The daycare closed and has not yet re-opened. The client has been looking for a new job for four months and has not found anything yet. In May, the Vicksburg Corps has been able to assist her with utility payments. Her water had been turned off, so The Salvation Army provided the client with drinking water and contacted the water company to help sort through her bill. The water company agreed to turn her water on the day the invoice was paid in full, so the Army paid the balance. Vicksburg Corps Officer, Major Janna Torgerson, hand-delivered the water bill, so the water was restored before the weekend.

 

Greenwood

A young mother of four was laid off from work and had recently experienced a house fire that resulted in losing all of her belongings. The Salvation Army of Greenwood gave her a clothing voucher to provide clothes for her and her children. The Greenwood Corps doesn’t have a shelter, so the Army covered a week’s stay in a hotel and helped the client to contact other local resources that could help. Corps Officers, Captains Jason and Keisha McMullin ended the time with the client in prayer and invited her to participate in the Pathway of Hope Program Ministry. The Army will assist in furnishing her new home.

 

Tuscaloosa

The Salvation Army in Tuscaloosa made a difference in a family with 13 children. As school approached this August, after a tough summer of layoffs and other stressors of COVID-19, the family needed everything. The Salvation Army provided clothes, backpacks, school supplies, snacks, and spiritual reassurance for a positive school year for all the children.

 

Huntsville

The Salvation Army of Huntsville has had the opportunity to assist several individuals who have never been in a position where they needed assistance. As first-time clients, they were nervous, embarrassed, and stressed. Huntsville Corps officers and staff were able to minister to them, share love and understanding instead of judgment.

 

Monroe

The Salvation Army of Monroe has provided meals, financial assistance, utility assistance, and housing throughout the Northeast Louisiana community to those affected by COVID-19 and back-to-back Hurricanes Laura and Delta. During a community feeding, a hungry woman stopped by the canteen for food for both her soul and physical being. After learning about The Salvation Army, she began to cry hysterically to be a blessing to her and others in the community. “This encounter was an emotional one for not only myself but others who were there,” Monroe Corps Officer, Captain Jerry Casey shared.

 

Gadsden

A deaf woman visited The Salvation Army of Gadsden shelter and could only communicate through sign language. Luckily, a corps staff member was fluent in sign language. This person was a Canadian citizen and did not have any family in the United States. In addition to serving her through shelter, the staff worked with the Canadian Embassy in Atlanta, Georgia, to contact her family back in Canada. The embassy provided an airplane ticket back to Canada and provided a temporary passport for the client to cross the border and be near home.

 

Providing Food and Hydration to Students in Walker County Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

The Salvation Army of Walker County, AL has assisted the Walker County, Marion, Winston, Coleman, Marshall, and Blunt communities throughout the pandemic by helping with rent and utility payments, delivering meals to the elderly, and grocery services, but the most unique service that this corps has provided during the pandemic is partnering with the Jasper County School System to provide snacks and hydration to students who are without water. Due to COVID-19 safety precautions, all school water fountains are off-limits, leaving many students who do not bring water dehydrated throughout the school day.

“We have a relationship with the school district, so I reached out to see what could be done for students doing the pandemic. It’s great to be able to help our neighbors,” stated Cynthia Smith, Walker County Service Center Director.

Nearly 87% of students are below the poverty level and have zero percent parent participation. After a Stuff the Bus school supply drop off, Smith asked what The Salvation Army could do to assist these children in need. The school principal asked for the Army to provide water and juice to students. Teachers have provided these supplies in the past, but it gets expensive over time. The Salvation Army received a grant to provide the school with hydration and snacks for the entire school year. Water delivery services began in October 2020, and hundreds of cases have been delivered to schools since then.

 

“If there’s a problem, there’s a solution.”

 

During Covid-19 isolation, students at Maddox Intermediate School in Jasper County had to bring the proper paperwork to schools to enroll for online learning. One of the students confided in the school librarian, Molly Bailey, informing her that she didn’t have food at home. Bailey, a United Way Spokesperson for Jasper County, called The Salvation Army and told Smith about her student’s situation.
“If there’s a problem, there’s a solution. I called Ms. Cindy [Cynthia Smith], and she immediately told me to go to Suns Grocery in Jasper and get that baby and that family whatever they need food-wise. No questions asked. It gives me the chills just thinking about this,” Bailey shared.

Bailey and another teacher grocery shopped for the student’s family and delivered the groceries to the child’s home. The confidentiality stays there so that the child doesn’t receive backlash for letting someone know that they need food.
“That teacher and I filled up two grocery buggies with groceries. We were thorough and thought through what we should get for the mom and her two daughters. We were able to feed this family for weeks and help the mom get back on her feet. We couldn’t have done that without Ms. Cindy and The Salvation Army. The mom didn’t ask for groceries, but it was the right thing to do,” Bailey stated.
Bailey signed up to volunteer with The Salvation Army during COVID-19 and became a regular volunteer.
“We built a rapport with the Salvation Army and ended up turning to them to partner to help our school systems provide water for students,” Bailey stated.
“I got my role of United Way spokesperson through volunteering with the Salvation Army. Ms. Cindy is a huge blessing to all of Walker County, whether we notice it or not. She does what she can to help those around her. No matter who they are., if she sees a need, she’s going to help or find someone who can. If we know there’s a need with students, we will help them,” Bailed added.

“There’s just so much that The Salvation Army does.”

 

The Walker County Service Center also partners with The Children’s Advocacy Center for abused kids. Comfort food provided by The Salvation Army helps these kids who have dealt with trauma to open up and become more welcoming to receiving help. The Army also helps Youth Advocate Programs (YAP), where students in foster care go for a safe place to visit with potential adoptive parents. These kids are also entered into the Angel Tree Program so that they can receive gifts for Christmas.
“That’s something they don’t have in their budget, but we do. So the organization comes to us for comfort food for their programs to help make the kids comfortable,” Smith stated.

 

“All of the kettles add up and it all helps.”

 

“I tell my funders that we’re blessed. Everyone has a role that God puts them in. For many, their role is the funder. It comes down to the journey of that donation. We’re on the front line. We see the donations and exactly how far every dollar goes when paired with other donations and how they help others. It’s huge. It all starts with the giving,” Smith stated.
“Partnerships are huge within our community. As we partner with other agencies, we can reach so many more people within our communities, but it all starts with that donor. If they didn’t do it, we couldn’t do what we do. For instance, with kettles. Many people think they are just sticking a little bit of change in it, but that change adds up. Last year, my granddaughter requested to add a kettle to her school. She and her classmates rang the bell upfront at their school for one week. At the end of that week, they’d raised $600 plus dollars in change from one small elementary school. That taught those kids what it means to give. You’re never too young to start giving, and you’re never too young to start volunteering. You can make a difference.
“All of the kettles add up, and it all helps. You figure out a way to make it happen, and you don’t stop. Our social services have not stopped since Covid-19 began, and that’s what you do. That’s what our mission is. That’s what we’re here for. You don’t stop when you’re tired; you stop when the job’s done, and it’s not done yet,” Smith added.

 

From New York To New Orleans: Carla’s Story

 

Carla turned to The Salvation Army New Orleans Command in early 2020 after being evicted from her Miami apartment. She lost her job due to a periodic reduction in force and was living on a fixed income. One month Carla ended up being $1.43 short on her rent. She was evicted and decided to leave Miami to return to New Orleans, a place she’d lived many years ago.

“That’s how you become homeless in the first place. You just don’t have enough money for your basic needs. At least there’s a place like The Salvation Army where people can go. At the end of the day, you have a roof over your head, and you have a meal,” Carla shared.

“It must’ve been God.”

 

Carla didn’t qualify for Medicaid after losing her job despite having diabetes. She entered The Salvation Army as a low-income senior. Many seniors are left in similar situations as Carla and don’t know where to turn. Thankfully, Carla turned to The Salvation Army.

“It must’ve been God because I didn’t choose any other place. I immediately turned to The Salvation Army. Looking back, it was the best decision I could’ve made,” Carla shared.

Carla worked as an artist in New York, doing restoration and embellishment for Mark West Gallery for over 20 years. After settling into her new life of living in a shelter, she walked out on faith and began working with a social worker to find employment. Carla came across a flier on the receptionist’s desk concerning a virtual job fair. She applied to a position with Volunteers of America, where she’d assist with packing lunches for school-aged kids during Covid-19 school shutdowns. She got the job and prepared meals for children until the position ended once schools reopened for the fall semester. Thankfully, an opening for a new cook at The Salvation Army New Orleans Command opened.

Carla enjoys baking pastries, so she applied for the job and was offered the position and will work with The Salvation Army until she retires next year.

“I worked in the art industry for 22 years and somehow ended up a cook at The Salvation Army,” Carla laughed. “I don’t question things, and I don’t believe anything is by coincidence,” she added.

“The Volunteers of America job ended up preparing me for my current position as a cook with The Salvation Army. Isn’t it funny how things work out?” Carla stated.

 

“The Salvation Army bolsters you if you’re smart enough to see it.”

 

Carla feels that she sometimes serves as a therapist to those who enter her kitchen. She ensures that everyone has a relaxing experience during their meals. Residents often linger to tell her about jobs that they’ve found or what’s going on in their lives. She also gets to interact with children who are staying at the shelter during meal times.

“I understand the people come through the line because I’ve lived with them. Not only am I a kitchen assistant, but I’m also a therapist. My job is to make dinner a pleasant experience for these people. They have to live outside all day in harsh conditions. I try to relay that if you’re still standing at the end of the day, you’re good. You’re stronger than the average person because you’ve learned how to survive under harsher conditions. It’s the truth. The Salvation Army bolsters you if you’re smart enough to see it. Sometimes you have to look outside of yourself,” Carla shared.

“There was one little girl who wanted an extra piece of cake at dinner, but I wasn’t able to give her one. Sometimes there’s enough food for seconds, and sometimes there isn’t. I saw the disappointment on her face and told her that I’d be sure to give her an extra slice the next day. She’d forgotten by dinner the next night, so I reminded her, and her face lit up so bright! It was adorable. I hope that if I do things now to touch these children who are in the shelter, maybe 10-15 years from now, they’ll remember and be kind to others. That’s how life works,” Carla added.

 

Majors Hull both told me not to worry. They would find me help, and everything would be okay.”

 

Carla says the most influential part of her short journey of living at The Salvation Army were her interactions with Corps Officers Majors Ernest and Debbie Hull.

“The greatest thing I got out of The Salvation Army was Major Debra Hull,” Carla shared.

“Major Debbie had a brand of discipline that I grew up with, and I give her all the credit for my sanity while living in the shelter. I just love her. Majors Hull both told me not to worry. They would find me help, and everything would be okay. That’s what kept me going. Those two are incredible people,” Carla added.

Carla and Majors Hull both share New York as their hometown and bonded over their shared culture.

“Both Major Debra Hull and I love Carla. She’s a wonderful person. We’re so proud of the effort she put in while in the shelter. She did everything she needed to do for her success. We were in COVID-19 isolation lock-down with her for 54 days in the shelter, so we became close. Carla became like a sister to us,” stated Major Ernest Hull, former New Orleans Commanding Officer, currently serving at the Armarillo, Texas Corps.

 

 “I’m happy to be able to spread a message of faith and strength to the people of The Salvation Army.”

 

A corps social worker reached out to Carla one day and told her that it was time to start working on an exit plan. Carla asked her to help look for a new home because she wasn’t familiar with New Orleans well enough to understand the best neighborhoods for her to live in.

“New Orleans is providential and backward to me! I don’t understand it, but that’s part of its charm. The people don’t move fast; everything is fluid,” Carla shared.

She found an apartment within a day and began the process of moving in.

“I love the city. I’ve been here before. I worked for Blain Kern in the ’90s. I left and went back home to New York for a while, but I’m back now,” Carla shared.

“I live near the French Quarter. Everything is within walking distance. It’s so convenient. I like being near the river. The Mississippi River and I have an amicable relationship,” she added.

Although she has returned to living independently, Carla enjoys returning to the shelter daily to positively contribute to people’s lives as a cook who can share a message of perseverance.

“You can lose your mind. You can literally lose your mind when you are homeless. I went from living in an apartment by myself for 15 years to living in a dorm room with 32 women who have all kinds of problems. I don’t get ruffled by a lot of things. I’m a New Yorker. I’m a progressive thinker. I see where people in the shelters are dealing with a lot. Multiple personality disorder, drug addiction, women who have dealt with abuse, or have dealt with the death of a child. I can see these people struggling to overcome their past. You see how some of them are so strong,” Carla shared.

“It’s important for everyone to know that you can make a situation as good or as bad as you want, and I’m happy to be able to spread a message of faith and strength to the people of The Salvation Army,” Carla added.

 

 

 

Salvation Army Continuing Zeta Relief Efforts Along Gulf Coast

Jackson, MS (10/30/2020) — Thousands are still without power after Hurricane Zeta ripped through the Gulf Coast as a Category 2 hurricane Wednesday evening. The Salvation Army units on the MS Gulf Coast and in Citronelle, AL, Houma, LA, Thomasville, AL, and Hattiesburg, MS, are all currently providing disaster relief services to those affected by Hurricane Zeta.

The most extensive of these relief efforts are occurring on the MS Gulf Coast. The MS Gulf Coast Area Command is serving hot meals from their canteen in front of The Salvation Army Family Store in Gulfport again this evening, as well as serving in Hancock County at the Bayside Fire Department, and will have a mobile feeding unit roaming in Waveland. The Salvation Army Pascagoula Corps is providing hot meals to residents of a flooded community in St. Martin. They will be handing out the meals from the parking lot of the St. Martin Community Center.

“We are so blessed to be able to serve this community and provide not only a hot meal but also comfort and hope during this trying time,” said Lt. Carla Lawson, Pascagoula Corps Officer. “Our community is strong and resilient; we will get through this together,” she continued.

The Salvation Army will sustain ongoing communication with emergency management officials regarding ongoing needs throughout the recovery period following hurricane Zeta.

Donations to support the disaster relief work of The Salvation Army can be made at www.helpsalvationarmy.org, or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY.

For the latest information on The Salvation Army’s response to Hurricane Zeta and other 2020 hurricanes, please visit www.disaster.salvationarmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

Gulf Coast Salvation Army Units Responding To Needs After Hurricane Zeta

Jackson, MS (October 29, 2020) — Hurricane Zeta tore through the storm-weary Gulf Coast last night, leaving millions without power in its wake. Salvation Army personnel are working closely with state and local emergency management officials to assess and meet needs throughout the affected areas. The Salvation Army Mississippi Gulf Coast Area Command is responding to local needs by serving hot meals tonight from their canteen (mobile feeding unit) at the Gulfport Salvation Army Family Store. The Salvation Army in Jackson County, MS, will be serving in conjunction with their local Sheriff’s office. The Salvation Army of Coastal Alabama is serving meals this evening in Citronelle, AL.

“The Salvation Army is thankful for the chance to serve those in need in cooperation with local authorities. We are blessed with such a helping and supportive community where we can share the challenge of meeting human needs,” said Major Bradley Caldwell, Salvation Army MS Gulf Coast Area Commander.

The Salvation Army will sustain ongoing communication with emergency management officials regarding ongoing needs throughout the recovery period following hurricane Zeta.

Donations to support the disaster relief work of The Salvation Army can be made at www.helpsalvationarmy.org, or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY.

For the latest information on The Salvation Army’s response to Hurricane Zeta and other 2020 hurricanes, please visit www.disaster.salvationarmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

Reclaim: A Gathering of Young Adults

The Salvation Army ALM Youth Department hosted a weekend of fun and faith with its Reclaim: A Gathering of Young Adults. The Reclaim weekend retreat took place at Camp Hidden Lake, October 23-25, 2020. The young adult’s retreat is an annual summer event but was pushed into late 2020 due to the novel coronavirus. Young adults ages 18-35 spent the weekend with Salvation Army officers, reclaiming their purpose amid the hardships of 2020 and looking to the future. The retreat had a 40 person max to enforce social distancing and other COVID-19 safety precautions.

“The theme is “reclaim,” as in reclaiming everything we feel has been stolen from us this year. COVID-19 created many limitations, and we’re trying to get into the mindset of reclaiming our peace, joy, and security. That’s why we’re doing recycled woodwork projects and reclaiming my finances courses during the retreat,” stated Captain Michael Good, Divisional Youth Secretary.

The retreat was designed around this Bible verse:

“God, your God, will restore everything you lost; He’ll have compassion on you; He’ll come back and pick up the pieces from all the places where you were scattered. No matter how far away you end up, God, your God, will get you out of there.” – Deuteronomy 30:3-4

 

“COVID-19 delayed this year’s retreat, so we decided to host one with a Halloween theme to reengage the young adults and get them back into the swing of being hands-on at their corps,” shared Captain Malaika Good, Divisional Youth Secretary.

“The retreat is a way to engage young adults who grew up in The Salvation Army as well as inform 730 members on how to become officers,” Captain MalaikaGood added.

730 is a group of people that have shown interest in becoming a Salvation Army officer. It takes 730 days to train to become an officer, hence the name of the program.

The retreat was filled with fall festivities, including a fire pit praise, reclaimed woodworking, DIY pumpkin spice lattes, and a murder mystery dinner. The woodworking class was a lesson on finding beauty in unlikely places by taking the time to make something new out of something old. “Reclaiming My Finances” was a course offered to help young adults understand how to create financial stability in today’s economy. “Pumpkin Spice and Everything Nice” was a course offered at camp where young adults could carve pumpkins, enjoy a mug of coffee or hot apple cider, and discuss the steps to becoming a Salvation Army officer. The retreat ended with the murder mystery dinner, a fun game night where participants wore their best Halloween costumes and enjoyed a meal with friends; just another way of reclaiming peace amid the unparalleled year that is 2020.

 

 

 

 

The Salvation Army Stands Ready To Respond To Hurricane Zeta

Jackson, MS (10/28/2020) —The Salvation Army Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi (ALM) Division is monitoring the storm and preparing for a rapid local response to Hurricane Zeta as needed, with 19 mobile feeding units on standby throughout the division. After strengthening throughout the day, Hurricane Zeta is expected to make landfall along the southeastern Louisiana coast on Wednesday afternoon, according to the National Hurricane Center.

The New Orleans area has had more than its share of hurricane threats in this extra busy hurricane season, but until now has managed to avoid each one. It looks like that is changing now, with Zeta poised to make landfall very near The Crescent City. “The Salvation Army is prepared and stands ready to serve our New Orleans community and surrounding areas as needed in the wake of Hurricane Zeta,” said Major Christopher Thornhill, Area Commander for the New Orleans Salvation Army.

Donations to support the disaster relief work of The Salvation Army can be made at www.helpsalvationarmy.org, or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY.

For the latest information on The Salvation Army’s response to Hurricane Zeta, and other 2020 hurricanes, please visit www.disaster.salvationarmy.org.

 

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

The Salvation Army Hurricane Delta Disaster Deployment to South Louisiana coming to a Close

LAFAYETTE, LA (October 17, 2020) The Salvation Army is winding up its disaster services in the Acadiana area of South Louisiana.  Over 99% of the power has been restored in this area and most of the residents are returning to normal activities.  With the support of nine Mobile Feeding Units from across the Southeast, approximately 20,000 meals have been provided, 11,000 drinks and 14,000 snacks.  There have been over 3,000 personal encounters in which emotional and spiritual care have been provided.  The Salvation Army is grateful to local officials who were a valuable resource in providing information about the worst hit areas in most need of food.  The strength of this operation is the mobility of the Feeding Units in their ability to get out into the communities to provide hot meals and snacks.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

The Salvation Army Continues to Provide Much Needed Food in Acadiana

LAFAYETTE, LA (October 14, 2020) – Salvation Army Mobile Feeding Units are continuing to provide meals, snacks, and drinks to the hardest areas of Acadiana.  Personnel is also on hand to provide Emotional and Spiritual care as needed.  This can simply involve a listening ear, a word of prayer, or encouragement. Over 8,300 meals have been served, as well as 4,700 drinks and snacks.

Although the Feeding Units rove as area’s needs are made known, they have served in communities such as Welsh, Lake Arthur, Cankton, New Iberia, Opelousas, Melville, Erath, Morse, and Washington.  For current information as to where The Salvation Army is serving, please call 211.

For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, follow the social feed on Twitter at @salarmyeds or visit disaster.salvationarmyusa.org. To donate to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts, visit HelpSalvationArmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

Meals, Refreshment and Prayers Delivered in Lake Charles

Lake Charles, Louisiana (October 14, 2020) – Twelve disaster response units and Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services (EDS) teams hit the streets of Lake Charles, on day four of service, after Hurricane Delta tore through the area. In addition to serving meals, snacks and drinks, staff and volunteers had the opportunity to pray with more than 360 individuals on Tuesday.

Rapid Response Units and mobile kitchens, staffed by teams from The Salvation Army Texas and Arkansas/Oklahoma Divisions (AOK) and the Southern Baptist Texas Convention, delivered 7,434 meals, 5,602 drinks, and 2,817 snacks in Calcasieu and Jefferson Davis Parish on Tuesday. The fleet of disaster response vehicles and personnel from different cities, states, and organizations have quickly galvanized into an effective team under the leadership of the Incident Management Team from The Salvation Army in Texas.

“Our Incident Management Team from Texas has worked together on a number of large-scale response efforts this summer and get right to work like a well-oiled machine,” said Alvin Migues, The Salvation Army EDS Director in Texas. “It has been good to also collaborate with our colleagues from the AOK Division and long-time partners in disaster relief, the Southern Baptist Texas Convention. This group has come together very quickly and is a great example of how The Salvation Army’s disaster response and Incident Command model should function. They are doing a great job of serving the basic needs of the Lake Charles community, with many neighborhoods still without power.”

As of Tuesday, all Salvation Army units have been assigned permanent feeding stations at the following locations:

  • Sulphur – 110 N. Cities Services Hwy, Sulphur (Iberia Bank)
  • Sulphur – Quick Shop Store – 404 W. Napoleon Street, Sulphur, LA
  • Iowa – 105 East Miller Ave., Iowa (Next to Old Subway)
  • Lake Charles – Lowes, 2800 Derek Dr, Lake Charles, LA 70607
  • Lake Charles – Roving -Van Buren and McKinley Sub-Division, Lake Charles
  • Northeast Lake Charles – 2231 Moeling Street, Lake Charles (Old Peggy’s Superette)
  • Moss Bluff – Walmart 260 Sam Houston Jones Parkway Moss Bluff, La.
  • West Lake- 909 Wehrt West Lake, La
  • Lacassine- Lacassine High School 409 Algonia Ave. Lacassine, La.
  • Lake Charles- Sunlight Manor 343 Goos St. Lake Charles, La.
  • Lake Arthur- City Hall 102 Arthur Ave. Lake Arthur, La.  Welsh Baptist Church – 500 S. Adams Welsh, La.

Another important aspect of any recovery effort is coordination with local emergency management teams and partners. “We have been actively working with VOAD, the United Way, the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security & Emergency Preparedness, and Little Caesar’s Pizza.,” said Migues. “As a result of these conversations The Salvation Army will be supporting a Point of Distribution (POD) at the Lake Charles Civic Center on Thursday and Friday (October 15-16, 2020) distributing food boxes, water, hygiene kits, and tarps.”

The Salvation Army has provided 21,559 meals, 16,762 drinks, 9,993 snacks, and made 1,378 Emotional and Spiritual Care contacts since Saturday, October 10 in the Lake Charles area.

For the latest information on The Salvation Army response efforts go to www.disaster.salvationarmyusa.org. To support ongoing Hurricane Delta relief efforts please visit www.HelpSalvationArmy.org.

 

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

The Salvation Army’s Southern Territory Providing Meals and Shelter For Hurricane Delta Relief

Jackson, MS (October 11, 2020) – Hurricane Delta made landfall overnight Friday, October 9th, near the town of Creole, Louisiana, a city in Cameron Parish with 660 residents, as a Category 2 hurricane. Creole is approximately 12 miles east, where Hurricane Laura made landfall six weeks ago. Thankfully, Hurricane Delta quickly weakened into a tropical depression and very few areas were affected.

The Salvation Army’s focus for service delivery will be Southwest Louisiana in Lake Charles and Lafayette, where there are widespread power outages. Power is being restored quickly going from 650,000 outages to 340,000 within the past 24 hours. Twenty-three shelters opened in Louisiana for emergency shelter from Delta with an overnight population of 7,419. As of 4 PM CDT on 10-10-2020, there were ten shelters open with 882 residents.

Twenty-six mobile feeding units were deployed to support service delivery in Lake Charles, Lafayette, Alexandria, and Monroe, LA. One Texas IMAT with disaster relief equipment deployed to Lake Charles on Saturday, October 10th, 2020, and one Florida IMAT with five mobile feeding units is deploying to Lafayette, Louisiana, today, October 11th, 2020. Approximately 84,000 meals are prepared for initial distribution in southwest Louisiana and other affected areas. Service delivery is predicted to last one week.

As natural disasters can increase mental stress, The Salvation Army’s Emotional & Spiritual Care HOPEline remains available.  Anyone needing a caring listener – whether because of natural disaster, COVID-19, or the stress of life in general – can call 844-458-HOPE (4673) for support.

For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, follow the social feed on Twitter at @salarmyeds or visit disaster.salvationarmyusa.org. To donate to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts, visit HelpSalvationArmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.

Hurricane Delta Weakens to Tropical Storm | The Salvation Army Moves in to Serve Neighbors in Need

JACKSON, Miss. (October 10, 2020) – Hurricane Delta made landfall overnight near Creole, Louisiana, a city in Cameron Parish with 660 residents, as a Category 2 hurricane. Creole is approximately 12 miles east of where Category 4 Hurricane Laura made landfall only six weeks ago.

As of 7 AM CDT today, Delta is a tropical storm moving north/northeast near 16 mph and is expected to continue to weaken into a tropical depression later today. A motion toward the northeast is expected to begin later today and continue through Sunday night. On the forecast track, Delta’s center should move across northeastern Louisiana this morning and then across northern Mississippi and into the Tennessee Valley later today and Sunday.

There 593,308 power outages throughout Louisiana and 90,852 power outages in Mississippi. Delta has produced a vast amount of rainfall in Louisiana, with one location reporting up to 17 inches of rain. It is expected to create an additional 2-5 inches of rain, with isolated storm totals of 10 inches. These rainfall amounts will lead to flash flooding. Delta is forecast to exit the ALM Division in the northwest corner of Alabama Sunday morning.

Thirty-two mobile feeding units are on standby to respond throughout the ALM Division. Approximately 70,000 meals are ready or being prepared for initial distribution in southwest Louisiana and other affected areas. An Incident Management Team with disaster relief equipment is now heading to Lake Charles from Beaumont, Texas, and has prepped 12,000 meals to fill immediate requests. The Salvation Army ALM Division monitors tropical storm Delta closely as we prepare to serve our neighbors in need.

As natural disasters can increase mental stress, The Salvation Army’s Emotional & Spiritual Care HOPEline remains available.  Anyone needing a caring listener – whether because of natural disaster, COVID-19, or the stress of life in general – can call 844-458-HOPE (4673) for support.

For the latest emergency disaster services news from The Salvation Army, follow the social feed on Twitter at @salarmyeds or visit disaster.salvationarmyusa.org. To donate to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts, visit HelpSalvationArmy.org.

About The Salvation Army
The Salvation Army annually helps more than 23 million Americans overcome poverty, addiction, and economic hardships through a range of social services. By providing food for the hungry, emergency relief for disaster survivors, rehabilitation for those suffering from drug and alcohol abuse, and clothing and shelter for people in need, The Salvation Army is doing the most good at 7,600 centers of operation around the country. In the first-ever listing of “America’s Favorite Charities” by The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The Salvation Army ranked as the country’s largest privately funded, direct-service nonprofit. For more information, visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org. Follow us on Twitter @SalvationArmyUS and #DoingTheMostGood.